Archive | Contract Disputes

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The Earlier The Mediation, The Better

The rules implementing statewide mediated settlement conferences in North Carolina generally require litigants to attend a pre-trial mediated settlement conference and typically a case management order establishes a deadline for completion of the conference.  Parties are free to decide how close to the deadline (or early) that the conference will be scheduled. There is a […]

Construction Site

Case Law Update: Modifications to Loan Agreements

Our firm routinely handles claims by contractors, lenders, and property owners involving construction defects, delays, and contract disputes.  Many times,  parties to a construction loan or development agreement modify the terms of the original agreement.  The terms of these modifications—and how they affect the parties’ obligations—are often disputed. A recent opinion from the North Carolina […]

Attorneys Fees

Reciprocal Attorneys’ Fees Provisions in Business Contracts

Reciprocal Attorneys’ Fees Provisions in Business Contracts We have previously discussed the scenarios in which prevailing parties in litigation can – and cannot – recoup their attorneys’ fees.  Unfortunately, the law is not particularly generous in allowing parties to recover their fees and costs.  Because there is one aspect of the relevant law that continually […]

Document

The Durable Power of Attorney under the New N.C. Law

Issues surrounding the execution and validity of powers of attorney can dramatically impact litigation, especially when a party is adjudicated incompetent.  When this happens, questions about the validity of the document inevitably arise, and occasionally the motives of the agent acting on behalf of an incapacitated party come into question. It doesn’t help that the […]

Boardroom

ICYMI: Case Update on Non-Compete Agreements

Restrictive covenants are a set of tools that employers sometimes utilize to prevent employees from competing with them after termination of their employment.   One of the most common restrictive covenants used by an employer is a “non-compete clause.”   An evaluation of the enforceability of a non-complete clause necessarily involves a balancing of interests.   On the […]

gavel

In case you missed it: Quick facts on enforcing your civil judgment

Many clients are surprised to learn that obtaining a judgment is not the end of the story in litigation. Even lawyers fall into the trap of celebrating a large verdict or favorable judgment before a judgment is actually collected.  The often disappointing reality, particularly in commercial litigation, is that a judgment is sometimes only the […]

Landscaping - Breach of K case update

Case Law Update: Breach of Contract

It is surprising how often clients seek advice for breach of contract claims but cannot articulate the scope of their agreement with the breaching party.  The North Carolina Court of Appeals recently issued an opinion that highlights just how problematic this can be. In Rider v. Hodges, two parties entered into an informal agreement for […]

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Domestication de-mystified: Four Steps for executing on your foreign judgment in North Carolina

In January, we discussed the judgment execution process.  In light of positive feedback, we wanted to follow that post by addressing a related, and equally intimidating process: domesticating a foreign judgment.  That is, if you are an out-of-state judgment creditor with a judgment against a North Carolina resident or corporation, how do you enforce your […]

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Can a Prevailing Party Recover Its Attorneys’ Fees?

Clients are naturally curious as to whether they can recoup their attorneys’ fees if they prevail in litigation.  The short (and disappointing) answer is: typically not.  Under the antiquated (and arguably more logical) “English Rule,” the losing party was forced to pay both its own attorneys’ fees and the prevailing party’s.  Unfortunately for successful litigants, […]